Hog anatomy

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Hog anatomy

Postby Greywolf » Sat Oct 17, 2009 8:54 pm

Les suggested I post this. It does contain pictures a butchered hog. but it shows just where and how far forward and low the vitals of a hog are located.

I killed a hog not too long ago, my partner and I were discussing the arrow hit and how we had different opinions of what vital organ it was. So we skinned the animal and opened it up to see.

Here is how a hog normally stands, the leg is bent like this when standing at rest just feeding

Image

I removed the front leg and opened the rib cage to expose where the heart lays, as you can see it's exactly between the front legs and lays directly on the breast bone, a close look shows the lungs are straddle of the heart and kinda small in relation to the body.
Image

I'll put the leg back on so you can get the picture, I'll raise the leg slightly forward for you to see the heart better
Image

If you were to take a "deer shot" on a hog (somewhere close to where my finger is pointing) you might catch the back of the lungs or have the arrow go between the lungs and the liver. the liver is quite small on a hog it's the same liver shape just smaller and laying flat against the diaphram...... not the lungs. And a small no mans land is created by this location of the liver, the back of the lungs at best, and that isn't a killing shot.
Image


Here is the whole chest cavity exposed as you can see there is a lot of room above the lungs(another no mans land) pending the size of the hog the size of a tennis ball or on a large hog the size of a soft ball.

Image

The lower location of the vital areas on a Hog has earned them the nick name "little tanks" in reality nothing vital is/was hit to kill them. But,they are tough little critters. But they do die within 20 yards when you destroy the lungs or heart.
The best shot is, shoot them in the arm pit, slightly quartering away and no more than 1/3 up from the bottom. It's real hard to shoot too low on a hog. "Too low" is a total miss.

I hope these pictures help. (shoot the bald spot when the hog steps and stands with the leg forward, it's the armpit)
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby yleecoyote23 » Sat Oct 17, 2009 10:10 pm

Great pics Mark!!!

Hard to get people to believe how low and forward all the "goodies" are on a hog!!!

Good stuff!!
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby TimZeigler » Tue Oct 20, 2009 12:37 pm

Very informative Mark, thanks for the pics.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby TradRag » Wed Oct 21, 2009 10:55 am

Very good info. I would have missed the vitals for sure. I needed this and hope to use it the info on my next hunt.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Hutch » Mon Oct 26, 2009 9:48 pm

yep, nuthin quit like a pissd and wounded hog, that knows where you are :shock:


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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Jesse Minish » Sat Nov 07, 2009 4:48 pm

Interesting. If I ever get to go hog hunting I will use this :( . Thanks for the info :D .
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Les » Tue Nov 17, 2009 9:15 am

Great lesson GW.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby RickBarbee » Mon Nov 23, 2009 9:40 am

To go along with the topic.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Newkirk Jerry » Mon Nov 23, 2009 10:29 am

If you shoot one quartering to you slightly and hit that front leg bone it will curl the tip on a Magnus 2-blade too. And, as stated above they don't really have a good attitude after that. :o
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby longbow » Thu Jan 07, 2010 9:47 am

I shot a 130 pound sow in Alabama and lost it because I shot where I had been practicing on a 3D target. The kill is as you said way up front and in the arm pit. I hit the hog about 2 and 1/2 inches behid the front leg and never found the pig. A lot of blood, but it started raining and I continued to follow the signs hoping not to loose the hog in the rain. I did put the hog up twice in about 150 yards and the last time was the last time. No sign, no hog, still had to pay for the hog $200. I did not mind paying as I seen a lot of hogs and some big big ones, the 350 to 400 pound ones, but did not have the money for anything other then a meat hog.

Don't trust the kill zone of a 3D target it is way off. The quartering way into the arm pit is the best shot.
Big boars can have a thick shield and hard to penatrate with a arrow.

Love thoes hogs and they taste great also.

Happy Hunting and God Bless:
Gary
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby 71flh » Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:05 am

Thanks for the lesson, I now know where to stick it. Really glad I found this site, good group.

Thanks again,

Ron
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Greywolf » Sat Jan 09, 2010 2:09 pm

Most drawings like the one above have larger organs pictured than they really are. look at the actual photo above, The lung don't extend past the back of the leg. the heart is centered directly between the two front legs. the lungs sit straddle of the heart. Which requires a tight quartering away shot as close to the leg as possible. Shootem in the armpit !

Hogs fight darn near to the death, all the major vital organs are behind the "Shield". The liver is covered by ribs as is the diaphragm. Hogs don't always run to escape, They have the fight or flight mentality. their lung capacity is smaller, as lets say compared to a deer. A large hog's lungs often times is just barely wider than a mans hand laid over it.

When they fight they sling the head in a sideways and in a upward motion, The tusk hits, the point is raked up the side of the body, the inside of the tusk is the sharp edge not the out side. It's like a gut hook knife blade, if the point goes in, it'll open ya up like a zipper. They sharpen them against the top teeth called filers, so when you hear them "Popping" their jaws, they are sharpening and getting ready to cut ya up if needed.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby TallP » Tue Jun 01, 2010 1:16 am

Your anatomy lesson definitely explains all the "ACTION" that I saw on my one and only hog hunt many years ago. It was a gun hunt in GA and apparently the individual introducing me to the 'excitement' of hog hunting didn't have a clue where the vitals were. That has pretty much cured me of wanting to hunt them all these years.
Now, armed with a little bit of knowledge, I MIGHT want to try it again.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Greywolf » Tue Jun 01, 2010 8:30 pm

I have a new hog area I'm starting, they will (hopefully) come in from down hill side, the wind in this little area always blows up to the power lines. I've done a little excavating and hopefully I'll be able to take a hog while on the ground. I mean, laying flat on the ground. I cut a 4 foot section out of a fallen tree. I'll be laying behind the tree on my belly and be able to shoot laying down.
Yes, I have been practicing. the trees will hide me but not offer much in the way of protection.

If the hog bolts uphill and runs between the logs all I'll be able to do it cover my head and hope.

Now that should be exciting.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby gwm » Sun Dec 19, 2010 1:18 pm

Excellent anatomy lesson; thank you. I wonder, how many of you have found remnants while butchering a hog, say broadhead or bullet, either in the shield or the no-man's-land that Greywolf mentions? I know this happens from time to time in whitetails, but does it occur more often in the hardy hog?
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Newkirk Jerry » Sun Dec 19, 2010 5:13 pm

That is making me wish I had some ribs, I love wild hog ribs.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Greywolf » Sun Dec 19, 2010 7:29 pm

gwm wrote:Excellent anatomy lesson; thank you. I wonder, how many of you have found remnants while butchering a hog, say broadhead or bullet, either in the shield or the no-man's-land that Greywolf mentions? I know this happens from time to time in whitetails, but does it occur more often in the hardy hog?


Aloha gwm

Funny you should say that. The whole reason we did this pictorial is this very hog was shot by my hunting partner Rick 3 weeks before.
"Now, how do you know that Greywolf?"
As I stated, we were sitting the upper high stands on the ranch. We were trying for a double kill that day, but my hog wouldn't cooperate,
so I signaled Rick to go ahead and shoot his and maybe mine would run, maybe stop and give me a shot. Rick shot from 18 yrds away and paralell to me so i didn't see the shot. I did hear the hogs squeel, I look back at rick.....he gave me the thumbs up.

Well he "said" he got a great hit, so we started to blood trail. It wasn't as heavy as it shoulda been with the type of hit he described....Ok, fast forward 4 hrs and two flashilghts later. We lost all blood sign.

Fast forward to the Pit 3 weeks later, same hog unknown to us comes in, Rick makes a perfect shot, 20 yards and a cartwheel hog is down !!!

While butchering the hog, Hense no skin on the carcas or legs on the front, I see a greenish looking wound inside the hog above the lung area in "No Mans land". It had whiteish stuff too in the wound, a quick flick of the knife revealed one green Bi Delta sharks tooth vane and a white coloored one also well

Rick is the only hunter on the island of Oahu (that I know of) that uses Bi-Delta Sharks tooth vanes in green and white combination.

This miss/hit gave us the idea to take pictures and show how tough hogs can be. Little Tanks as I call them and the true actual location of the vital organs, not some drawing.
I have found 2 broadheads in one hog, scars from unknown causes, 00 buck pellets, missing ears, broken lower jaws from bullet wounds, missing feet from broken snare wire, pass through scars from arrows. The list goes on and on

Trust me !!! if you hit anywhere behind the line of the back of the front leg and broadside your chances of recovery just dropped by a bunch of percentage points.

One of the great things about doing Game Management and damage control is, I get to see what damage the arrow did on every hog I kill, What did or didn't happen, what angle was good and which one wasn't.

With almost 1,000 hogs to my credit, I'm still amazed at what I see and how they can survive less than perfect hits.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby gwm » Sun Dec 26, 2010 8:50 pm

I think I need to visit Hawaii and practice on them hogs. ;)
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Greywolf » Mon Dec 27, 2010 10:15 pm

Told the boss come next week, I'm gonna be doing a 7 hrs work day for a couple weeks so i can get out and hunt.

The ranch is over run with hogs, gotta kill about 20-25 to make the riders happy. Seen some nice tracks today....
Funny ya can't work in the rain, but ya can scout in the rain...... :eek:
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby quiet man » Sat Jan 29, 2011 9:06 pm

Here is a pretty good one
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby TioJander » Wed May 30, 2012 12:07 pm

Hey.

I am new to this forum. I apologize for my poor knowledge of the English language. Sorry.

I only bring you my experience with wild boar, Our wild boar in Europe " the Jabali " ​​is a little different, but in essence is a " sus scrofa " and its anatomy is more or less similar.

I refer to you a study on the anatomy of the european wild boar.
I ask you to see that the spine is always located much further down than usual that we see in the drawings and studies that are often in forums and magazines.

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And the internal vision.

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Tanks
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby KsDanny » Sat Dec 29, 2012 12:01 pm

Thanks for the lesson Greywolf. I'm scheming on a hog hunt as we speak and obviously knowing where to place the arrow will have a lot to do with my success when I get the chance. Danny
"You know a tree by the fruit it bears" God
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby Greywolf » Sat Dec 29, 2012 12:31 pm

KsDanny wrote:Thanks for the lesson Greywolf. I'm scheming on a hog hunt as we speak and obviously knowing where to place the arrow will have a lot to do with my success when I get the chance. Danny



Aloha Danny
I have a shot I call the "Mark shot" it's deadly, the position is slightly quartering away.... Now people have asked me how much quartering away ? I just use to say a little bit but I found an answer that will serve to answer that exact question. Look between the front legs, if you can see between them he's quartering away, if you can see one fingers width of space that's quartering away if you see 2 fingers worth of space, that is the "Mark Shot" then it's simple, shoot it in the arm pit, that pocket you see aim for the center hair of the pocket.

As the picture above shows, the heart sets directly center between the legs and right on the breast bone and is just 3 inches into the skin at that angle, the rib bones are very small and just connected by cartilage not bone to bone.
There is alway a benefit to this shot, there is no fat in this area to plug the hole, it will pour out like a hole in a bucket. Can't get much better than this !!

Image

Yes Sir this is a actual Africa 2 blade Hunor broadhead blood trail kill

Hogs are tough, But they die quick with a well places sharp broadhead.
Good luck on your hunt, play the wind, put hand corn close and wait for the shot !!

Take plenty of pictures too.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby KsDanny » Mon Dec 31, 2012 12:41 pm

Now thats a blood trail even I could follow. I like the quartering away shots on deer too, since I do most of my hunting on the ground. I shot a doe at 10yds this year from my ground blind and the tip of my bow hit the inside of the blind and took some of the speed off. But, it hit right where I wanted it and it was a quartering away shot and she died quickly with plenty of blood. Danny
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby tarponnut » Mon Jan 14, 2013 2:37 pm

I have had several clients swear they hit them "right in the pocket" only to lose the blood trail later. Since I have a lot of trail cams on my property I am able to keep fairly close tabs on the resident pigs. Four times in the last year I've had hogs show up later on trail cam pics that we thought were goners(one I had shot).
(We have some black hogs but most have spots or patches, so they are pretty identifiable)

They are tough animals if you miss the vitals.
Double lunged or heart shot hogs rarely go more than one hundred yards(usually less). That's not to say you can't recover a marginally shot hog(guts, liver, hams,etc). Just have to let them lay or get a second arrow in them if you can.

Straight up the front leg, one third of the way up will kill them within 100 yards with a sharp broadhead.
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby tarponnut » Mon Jan 14, 2013 2:50 pm

I had a client shoot one at 15 yards Saturday morning. I was video taping. He was about two inches low of making a perfect heart shot. As it turned out, he hit the upper leg near the elbow but under the chest(just skin, I don't think even muscle). At first, I thought he heart shot it but as it ran off the arrow was flopping around and then dragging the ground. I reviewed the footage to confirm it. That particular pig has nine lives! He was missed three times clean last year and now escaped with barely a scratch. We call him Big White.
I will post it on my Youtube channel later today(with all of my squirrel misses,lol)
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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby full tiller » Sat Jul 27, 2013 2:40 am

It's absolutely amazing how tough hogs are. Like Tarponnut says when you get a shaft in the boiler room they aren't long for this world.

My wife hit two in less than 3 minutes, they were recovered less than 40 yards from the shot, and about 20 yards apart. That same night my daughter put a crossbow bolt into that dead zone explained earlier. We trailed that hog for two hours. If you've never crawled on your hands and knees looking for blood spots no bigger than a needle point in Texas brush and brambles... I don't suggest it. The whole time I was wondering what was going to kill me first, the wounded hog or the stickers! She never got to finish the task.

You all have done a great job on the anatomy section, so I won't chime in to repeat any already shared information. I will say that the feral hog is a reproductive wonder. Sows can drop litters of up to 8 or more piglets as many as three times a year if conditions are right... and let's be honest... just about any condition is right for hogs. One sow can populate her own sounder in less than two years time. They become fertile at an alarmingly early age, too.

I've seen strips of asphalt road that have been busted up due to their rooting. When they find an area they like, they just trash the place and move on.

For those that have never butchered a hog, keep in mind that there are strange little dark colored sacs inside the body cavity. I don't recall if these sacs serve a purpose or not, but in the butchering process try to remove these things. If they end up in the burger meat tray, they add an intolerably nasty flavor to the meat. In areas that are not already overrun by feral hog, local butchers may not be aware of what these things are, (Much like myself at the moment), and could potentially grind them up with your hard earned burger stuffs. I'll see if I can't dig up what those are and share it here.

Hog hunting can be just as exciting and rewarding as deer in my opinion, and like Greywolf mentions... stick that arrow right in the bald spot for the best and most successful results.
- Rick

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Re: Hog anatomy

Postby J.james » Tue Dec 23, 2014 4:19 am

IMO, the best place to aim is right behind the base of the leg
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